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Lori L. Rook

August 4, 2008

 

The American Revolution: The Colonies Unite and Rebel

Grade 5

 

 

Lesson Title 1: Fighting for Control

 

Lesson Title 2: Colonists Speak Out

 

Lesson Title 3: Colonists Speak Out—Part 2

 

Lesson Title 4: Disagreements Grow

 

Lesson Title 5: The People of the Revolution

 

 

Overview

 

These lessons are the beginning portion of the Revolutionary War Unit that is part of the fifth grade Social Studies curriculum. In the previous unit the students learned about life in the colonies and now the focus is the move to independence. The goals I hope to accomplish for my students are knowledge about the disagreements that led to the Revolution, what people and groups impacted the Revolution, and the major events and battles. Throughout the lessons, I am integrating technology in a variety of ways in order to meet different learning styles. Students are more visual, so I found short videos, the ebook, activities, simulations, and websites that can impart the information needed in a different way than just the text. I would have a hard time not using technology in this unit because it is an engaging tool for learners that meets several different learning styles. I also use graphic organizers instead of large amounts of outlines and notes to help link the information. The iMovie project allows the students to research and construct meaning about key people of the Revolutionary War--men and women, while producing a one-minute movie. Students are often surprised that women were actively involved in the fight for independence.

 

After these lessons, this unit continues with the Declaration of Independence, some of the battles, life during the Revolution, victory at Yorktown, etc.

 

 

 


Name: Lori L. Rook                                                    Grade Level: 5

School: Jefferson Elementary                                      Subject: American History

Date: August 1, 2008                                                   Lesson Time: 45 minutes

 

Lesson Title: Fighting for Control

 

  1. Background, Context, and Purpose of the Lesson:
    1. My classroom consists of 24 students, twelve boys and twelve girls. I also teach Social Studies to two other classes of students; also 24 in each group for a total of 72 students.  A number of gifted and talented (GATE) students are also part of this number, usually six to nine. Approximately nine students are on an IEP with various learning needs. These students will need modified assignments and a modified test read to them orally.  This lesson is the first one in The American Revolution Unit during which the students learn about the French and Indian War.
    2. On the previous day, a lesson has been conducted where students accessed prior knowledge of the Revolutionary War by brainstorming and recording responses in a word web. A teacher-led survey of the chapter was conducted, paying close attention to the headings, pictures, charts, maps, vocabulary, etc.

 

  1. Lesson Goals and Objectives:
    1. Indicator 1:      Analyze U.S. historical eras to determine connections and cause/effect relationships in reference to chronology.

                                                     i.     5.US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.

    1. Indicator 2:      Evaluate the influence/impact of various cultures, philosophies, and religions on the development of the U.S.

                                                     i.     5.US.2.2. Students are able to describe the political relationship between the colonies and England.

  1. Materials:
    1. Harcourt Social Studies: The United States student text

                                                     i.     Lesson 1-Fighting for Control pp. 222-227

    1. http://www.eharcourtschool.com (this is an electronic version of the textbook)

                                                     i.     Unit 3-Start with a Video

                                                       ii.     Unit 3-Chapter 6 p. 222-227

    1. Reading Support and Intervention Graphic Organizer page 89
    2. Timeline of Events Leading to Revolution Posters at the front of the classroom
  1. Technology:
    1. Teacher Laptop
    2. LCD Projector
    3. Sympodium
    4. Internet/Network Connection
  2. The Lesson:
    1. Introduction:

                                                     i.     Spotlight on the Big Idea

1.     As students enter the classroom, they observe the Sympodium Spotlight turned on the ebook video. This short online video is played followed by a quick discussion of the Big Idea of this unit.

2.     Big Idea—Freedom: Freedom was so important to the colonists that they were willing to suffer terrible hardships and years of war to win it. During this chapter, we will be learning about the events that lead the colonists to demand their freedom.

    1. Methods:

                                                     i.     Objectives—Students will:

1.     Describe the fight to control North America

2.     Describe how alliances between Native Americans & colonists affected the French and Indian War

3.     Explain the new laws passed after the French & Indian War

                                                       ii.     Instruction:

1.     The teacher accesses the ebook version of the text on the computer. It is projected onto the screen. The students have their books open also and follow along as the text is read.

2.     The teacher calls upon various students to click on the Play button for various parts of the text to be read.

3.     The first section called, “Conflicting Claims” is read. Working together the students and the teacher decide the information to be written on the graphic organizer page. The page is also projected on the Sympodium so that students can see and hear what to write.

4.     Continue in this fashion for the section called, “The French and Indian War Begins” and “The War Expands.” The teacher circulates around the room assisting students as necessary with the graphic organizer. It is also very helpful to call upon students to show exactly where the information was found. Using the Sympodium, students can underline the text on the projected page.

5.     Students read the “More Troubles” section with their table group and complete the last section on the graphic organizer together.

                                                         iii.     Practice:

1.     No extra practice outside the classroom is planned for this lesson. If necessary Homework and Practice Book p. 52 can be assigned.

    1. Lesson Closure:

                                                     i.     Students pair and share the answers to two of the four questions written on the Sympodium.

1.     Who was fighting to control the Ohio Valley during the French and Indian War?

2.     Why were they competing for the Ohio Valley?

3.     Who formed alliances with the two sides of the war?

4.     Who won the French and Indian War?

    1. Back Pocket Ideas:

                                                     i.     Vocabulary Reinforcement Page

                                                       ii.     Homework and Practice Book p. 52

                                                         iii.     1776 Magazine p. 2-5

    1. Assessment:

                                                     i.     Review orally with the students the closure questions.  This will be a quick check of understanding. It is important that students hear again the correct answers. Students line up by tables to the door.

    1. Reflection:

                                                     i.     The French and Indian War was considered the first event that led to the Revolutionary War. In the past, it has been difficult for the students to comprehend. Most of them believe the French and the Indians won the war because of its name so connecting it to the British and the colonists and the Revolutionary War is important. It is essential to jump in during the reading to assist in understanding and completion of the graphic organizer. I constantly move around the room checking on student groups and monitoring their progress. Projecting a copy of the graphic organizer and the text page really assists in understanding.  In the past I have had students with handwriting difficulties, so I do some of the writing for them or make a copy of my completed organizer for them to highlight.  Depending on the group, the lesson may need to be divided into two parts.

 

 



Name: Lori L. Rook                                                    Grade Level: 5

School: Jefferson Elementary                                      Subject: American History

Date: August 1, 2008                                                   Lesson Time: 45 minutes

 

Lesson Title: Colonists Speak Out

 

  1. Background, Context, and Purpose of the Lesson:
    1. My classroom consists of 24 students, twelve boys and twelve girls. I also teach Social Studies to two other classes of students; also 24 in each group for a total of 72 students.  A number of gifted and talented (GATE) students are also part of this number, usually six to nine. Approximately nine students are on an IEP with various learning needs. These students will need modified assignments and a modified test read to them orally. The purpose of this lesson is to help students learn more about the events that lead the colonists to rebel against Great Britain.
  2. Lesson Goals and Objectives:
    1. Indicator 1:      Analyze U.S. historical eras to determine connections and cause/effect relationships in reference to chronology.

                                                     i.     5.US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.

    1. Indicator 2:      Evaluate the influence/impact of various cultures, philosophies, and religions on the development of the U.S.

                                                     i.     5.US.2.2. Students are able to describe the political relationship between the colonies and England.

  1. Materials:
    1. Harcourt Social Studies: The United States student text

                                                     i.     Lesson 2- Colonists Speak Out pp. 230-236

    1. http://www.eharcourtschool.com (this is an electronic version of the textbook)

                                                     i.     Unit 3-Chapter 6 p. 230-236

    1. Reading Support and Intervention Graphic Organizer page 93
    2. Timeline of Events Leading to Revolution Posters at the front of the classroom
    3. Story Mapping History Frame Sheet
    4. American Revolution and Revolutionary War Causes and Effects—Stamp Act

                                                     i.     http://www.mrnussbaum.com/history/stampact.htm

 

  1. Technology:
    1. Teacher Laptop
    2. LCD Projector
    3. Sympodium
    4. Internet/Network Connection
    5. Student wireless laptops
  2. The Lesson:
    1. Introduction:

                                                     i.     As students enter the classroom, they pick up the Story Mapping History Frame sheet and complete it as a review of yesterday’s lesson about the French and Indian War. This will be quickly checked before beginning the lesson for today.

                                                       ii.     While waiting, and if their history frame sheet is complete, students access their laptop and read about the Stamp Act from the website. http://www.mrnussbaum.com/history/stampact.htm

 

    1. Methods:

                                                     i.     Objectives- Students will:

1.     Identify the laws that caused conflicts in the colonies

2.     Explain the importance of the Committees of Correspondence

                                                       ii.     Instruction:

1.     The History Frame worksheet is quickly corrected in class as a review. Students may make changes to the frame based on their new understanding.

2.     The teacher accesses the ebook version of the text on the computer. It is projected onto the screen. The students have their books open also and follow along as the text is read.

3.     The teacher calls upon various students to click on the Play button for various parts of the text to be read.

4.     The first section called, “The Stamp Act” is read. Working together the students and the teacher decide the information to be written on the graphic organizer page. The page is also projected on the Sympodium so that students can see and hear what to write. This should be easier after yesterday’s lesson.

5.     Students read the “Colonists Work Together” section with their table group and complete that section on the graphic organizer together.

6.     The teacher calls upon students to write on the projected graphic organizer, the answer to the second section. Through the discussion, students may make changes to their organizer.

                                                         iii.     Practice:

1.     Assign students to read 234-236 in the text and complete the last two sections of the organizer about the Townshend Acts and the Boston Massacre.

    1. Lesson Closure:

                                                     i.      In their Social Studies Learning Log, students will write at least one thing they learned or found interesting about the lesson and share their entry with their table groups.

    1. Back Pocket Ideas:

                                                     i.     Homework and Practice Book p. 55

                                                       ii.     1776 Magazine p. 6-7

                                                         iii.     Play—“Boston Massacre”

                                                        iv.     http://www.mrnussbaum.com/arce.htm

1.     Townshend Acts

2.     Boston Massacre

 

    1. Assessment:

                                                     i.     The Reading Support and Intervention Graphic Organizer will be checked the following day.

    1. Reflection:

                                                     i.     Because I have large round tables in my classroom instead of desks, I allow students to talk, share, and work together during different parts of my lessons. I have screens for those times that work needs to be private, but I believe talking is an important part of the learning process. Students often believe that these events happened very quickly in a short amount of time and do not understand that the events leading to the Revolution took place over several years. That is why I use a timeline of events at the front of my classroom. It is interesting to note that during this lesson, the only African American of the Revolutionary War is mentioned; Crispus Attucks. None of my students think to ask about the other African Americans that had to be living in North America at this time, unless I bring up the question. There is also a short mention in the text about women and children supporting the boycott of British goods by sewing and spinning.

 

 



Name: Lori L. Rook                                                    Grade Level: 5

School: Jefferson Elementary                                      Subject: American History

Date: August 1, 2008                                                   Lesson Time: 45 minutes

 

Lesson Title: Colonists Speak Out- Part 2

 

  1. Background, Context, and Purpose of the Lesson:
    1. My classroom consists of 24 students, twelve boys and twelve girls. I also teach Social Studies to two other classes of students; also 24 in each group for a total of 72 students.  A number of gifted and talented (GATE) students are also part of this number, usually six to nine. Approximately nine students are on an IEP with various learning needs. These students will need modified assignments and a modified test read to them orally. At this point students still aren’t always clear about why the colonists were so upset about the taxes and treatment they received from Great Britain. The simulation activity in this lesson allows the students to feel what it’s like to be taxed and have no say in those taxes.
  2. Lesson Goals and Objectives:
    1. Indicator 1:      Analyze U.S. historical eras to determine connections and cause/effect relationships in reference to chronology.

                                                     i.     5.US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.

    1. Indicator 2:      Evaluate the influence/impact of various cultures, philosophies, and religions on the development of the U.S.

                                                     i.     5.US.2.2. Students are able to describe the political relationship between the colonies and England.

  1. Materials:
    1. BrainPop Website- Causes of the American Revolution

                                                     i.     http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/ushistory/

    1. “The King’s M&M’s” activity from American History Simulations published by Teacher Created Materials.
    2. Role cards: King(1), Parliament (2), Tax Collectors(2), Colonists (19)
    3. 3 large bags of plain M&M’s
    4. small Dixie cups
    5. latex free gloves
    6. large bowl
    7. crown for the King/Queen of Great Britain
    8. 4x6 note cards for student responses
  1. Technology:
    1. Teacher Laptop
    2. LCD Projector
    3. Sympodium
    4. Internet/Network Connection
  2. The Lesson:
    1. Introduction:

                                                     i.     As students enter the classroom, they observe the Sympodium Spotlight turned on the BrainPop site about Causes of the American Revolution. Students watch the short video and then complete the ten-question quiz. The teacher calls upon students to read each quiz question and click on the correct answer using the Sympodium. Students do not move on to the next question until it is correct. Tim and Moby, the main characters in the videos on this site, are appealing to the students and most pick up on the humorous elements.

    1. Methods:

                                                     i.     Objectives—The students will:

1.     Explain why the colonists were upset with British tax laws

2.     Identify two tactics colonials used to demonstrate their displeasure with these taxes.

                                                       ii.     Instruction—

1.     At the start of class, give each student a paper cup containing ten M&M’s. Instruct the students not to touch them at this time and that they will get to eat their M&M’s at the end of the activity.

2.     Randomly pass out the role cards to students. Explain that those possessing the King and Parliament roles should move to the front of the room. The King will take a designated seat of honor and wear a crown. Parliament members will stand at one side of the King. Tax collectors are seated with the colonists.

3.     Members of Parliament will draw from the teacher’s previously compiled and prepared group of Object Cards. These are the items that will be taxed. Parliament will announce to the Colonists the item to be taxed (e.g. tennis shoes) and anyone possessing that item will have to pay out the number of M&M’s equal to the number written on the object card. So if the card marked tennis shoes---3 is pulled, each colonists attired in tennis shoes would relinquish 3 M&M’s.

4.     The students who are Tax Collectors do all of the collecting using gloves. All taxes are returned to Parliament and dumped into a large bowl. Taxes should be levied for at least 3 items, but not more than six. Four items works well.

5.     After all the taxes have been levied, the funds are dispersed. The tax collectors each receive 10%. Parliament receives 50% to be split evenly between the two students. Finally, King George receives 40% for himself. These percentages have no real historical significance and are only an arbitrary breakdown for this simulation. It is quite possible that while some students will have had all of their M&M’s confiscated, members of Parliament and the king will have upwards to thirty or forty pieces.

6.     NOTE—Some students will show definite feelings of displeasure just as some on the receiving end of this taxing may gloat a bit too much. Some colonists will try to hide their M&M’s or their items. This will actually be great to talk about during the discussion portion and relate this to the actual colonists.

7.     To develop understanding of how the colonists reacted to the tax laws and the tax collectors, discuss the following:

a.     What was so unfair about how the class was taxed?

b.    How could it have been handled more fairly?

c.     Why were tax collectors tarred and feathered?

d.    Why were British goods boycotted?

e.     Do you think the actual colonists tried to avoid paying taxes the way you did? Why?

f.      What ways did the colonists resist and protest these laws?

8.     Be sure to complete this simulation during one class period to avoid hard feelings. Students may eat their candy during the lesson closure activity. It is very interesting to observe student behavior during this time. Some students will share their candy with others. Sometimes the students in the role of king and Parliament are very uncomfortable. It is important to be sure the students understand that the simulation is over.

    1. Lesson Closure:

                                                     i.     Exit Card- Each student write on a 4x6 index card for 3-5 minutes about the simulation.  They will have plenty to say about taxes! The card is collected from the students as they leave the room.

    1. Back Pocket Ideas:

                                                     i.     1776 Magazine p. 8-9

                                                       ii.     Homework and Practice p. 53-54

                                                         iii.     Paper copy of BrainPop Quiz

    1. Assessment:

                                                     i.     The teacher reads the Exit Cards to check student understanding. Several cards can be pulled and read without names the next day.

    1. Reflection:

                                                     i.     This simulation is a great way to make students aware of taxation and why the colonists were so angry about Great Britain’s taxes. The students have no control over the items taxed and get frustrated very quickly. Some of the items that can be taxed are hair, tennis shoes, jewelry, glasses, white socks, blue jeans. Sometimes the student tax collectors really “enjoy” their job, which directly affects the frustration of the student colonists. Last year I did have to make it very clear that Great Britain did NOT tax hair. I guess one of my students missed the whole stamp tax part of the lesson. J  I have found that it’s very important that students complete the exit card part of the lesson so that they can share their thoughts and feelings about the simulation. As the teacher, my role is to be a very active facilitator in this simulation so that it doesn’t get out of hand.

 

 



Name: Lori L. Rook                                                    Grade Level: 5

School: Jefferson Elementary                                      Subject: American History

Date: August 1, 2008                                                   Lesson Time: 45 minutes

 

Lesson Title: Disagreements Grow

 

  1. Background, Context, and Purpose of the Lesson:
    1. My classroom consists of 24 students, twelve boys and twelve girls. I also teach Social Studies to two other classes of students; also 24 in each group for a total of 72 students.  A number of gifted and talented (GATE) students are also part of this number, usually six to nine. Approximately nine students are on an IEP with various learning needs. These students will need modified assignments and a modified test read to them orally. During this lesson, students will discover and find out more about other ways the colonists protested against the British and about the first shots fired of the war.
  2. Lesson Goals and Objectives:
    1. Indicator 1:      Analyze U.S. historical eras to determine connections and cause/effect relationships in reference to chronology.

                                                     i.     5.US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.

    1. Indicator 2:      Evaluate the influence/impact of various cultures, philosophies, and religions on the development of the U.S.

                                                     i.     5.US.2.2. Students are able to describe the political relationship between the colonies and England.

  1. Materials:
    1. Famous Moments in American History—“Shot Heard Around the World”

                                                     i.     http://www.earlyamerica.com/shot_heard.htm

    1. Harcourt Social Studies: The United States student text

                                                     i.     Lesson 3- Disagreements Grow pp. 238-243

    1. http://www.eharcourtschool.com (this is an electronic version of the textbook)

                                                     i.     Unit 3-Chapter 6 p. 238-243

    1. Harcourt Brace Interactive Adventure-American Revolution

                                                     i.     http://www.harcourtschool.com/ss1/adventure_activities/interactives/gr5_unit4.html

 

    1. Timeline of Events Leading to Revolution Posters at the front of the classroom
    2. Story Mapping History Frame Sheet- 2 copies per student
  1. Technology:
    1. Teacher Laptop
    2. LCD Projector
    3. Sympodium
    4. Internet/Network Connection
    5. Student wireless laptops
  2. The Lesson:
    1. Introduction:

1.     As students enter the classroom, they observe the Sympodium Spotlight turned on the Famous Moments in American History site. The short video, “Shot Heard Around the World” is played. Then the teacher reviews the Big Idea of the unit from lesson one—Freedom.  Freedom: Freedom was so important to the colonists that they were willing to suffer terrible hardships and years of war to win it. During this lesson, we will be learning about more events that lead the colonists to demand their freedom.

    1. Methods:

                                                     i.     Objectives--Students will:

1.     Explain why the colonist refused to accept the new laws passed by Parliament

2.     Describe why fighting broke out at Lexington and Concord

                                                       ii.     Instruction:

1.     Review with the students “No Taxation without Representation”. What does this mean? Remember how it felt yesterday to be taxed and have no say in what those taxes were. Have a short discussion. This would be the perfect time to read a few of yesterday’s exit cards.

2.     The students log onto the computers and access the e-book link and use the table of contents to find lesson 3. Together the students read the first section, “The Boston Tea Party” and complete the History Frame with their table groups.

3.     The History Frame is projected onto the screen and written on using the Sympodium. Be sure the students complete each section. If needed, refer back to the ebook and highlight the text where the answers can be found.

4.     Read together the two sections about the Coercive Acts and the First Continental Congress using the projected ebook. Students may be called upon to click the play button. Stop to discuss as needed.

5.     Students read together on the ebook the fourth section called, “Lexington and Concord” and complete another History Frame. This will be checked at the beginning of class the next day for accuracy.

    1. Lesson Closure:

                                                     i.     Use the Lesson Summary on ebook p. 243 to close the lesson. Have the students restate the key content.

    1. Back Pocket Ideas:

                                                     i.     Reading Support and Intervention Graphic Organizer p. 97

                                                       ii.     Homework and Practice Book p. 56

                                                         iii.     Check the Lexington and Concord History Frame in class

    1. Assessment:

                                                     i.     Students access the link for the Harcourt Brace Interactive Adventure-American Revolution and play the interactive game. Correct answers move the students through the activity and help them discover the spy. If there is not time for each student to log on, then the teacher can project the game on the screen and play it as a class.

1.     http://www.harcourtschool.com/ss1/adventure_activities/interactives/gr5_unit4.html

    1. Reflection:

                                                     i.     At this point I have found that it is necessary to review the poster timeline at the front of the room and talk about each event again and the time. We also discuss that shots have been fired for revolution, but war has not yet been declared. We have to talk about why this is such a big deal to rebel against Great Britain at this time in history. Talking about how Great Britain was the “super power” of that time with the strongest army and navy helps. I also have a game that we play in each class where we simulate the Revolutionary War. I divide the class into British and Americans. The game includes action cards, decision cards, and a score sheet. It takes place over the rest of the Revolutionary War study and the students get an idea of how tough it really was to win independence. Most of the time, at least one of the three classes defeats the British. I really like the Revolutionary War study and try to do everything I can to make history interesting and engaging for my students.

 

 



Name: Lori L. Rook                                                    Grade Level: 5

School: Jefferson Elementary                                      Subject: American History

Date: August 1, 2008                                                   Lesson Time: 6-8 sessions of 45 min.

 

Lesson Title: People of the Revolution

 

  1. Background, Context, and Purpose of the Lesson:
    1. My classroom consists of 24 students, twelve boys and twelve girls. I also teach Social Studies to two other classes of students; also 24 in each group for a total of 72 students. A number of gifted and talented (GATE) students are also part of this number, usually six to nine. Approximately nine students are on an IEP with various learning needs. These students will need modified assignments and a modified test read to them orally, but I have found that they deeply enjoy the iMovie project and produce movies of high quality. During this series of lessons, students will be researching and creating a one-minute iMovie about a key Revolutionary War person. The students will view the movies and also show them to a class of 4th graders.
  2. Lesson Goals and Objectives:
    1. Indicator 1:      Analyze U.S. historical eras to determine connections and cause/effect relationships in reference to chronology.

                                                     i.     5.US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.

  1. Materials:
    1. Revolutionary War Hero Research Chart- one per student
    2. List of Revolutionary War Heroes- slips to be drawn for during class
    3. Example of one minute iMovie—Henry Knox
    4. Scoring Rubric
  2. Technology:
    1. Teacher Laptop
    2. LCD Projector
    3. Sympodium
    4. Internet/Network Connection
    5. Student wireless laptops with iMovie
    6. Research Links

                                                     i.     The American Revolution: Biographies

1.     URL: http://www.americanrevolution.com/Biographies.htm

                                                      ii.     Women in the Revolution

1.     http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/score_lessons/women_american_revolution/

                                                        iii.     Traitors, Seamstresses, and Generals: Voices of the American Revolution

1.     http://library.thinkquest.org/TQ0312848/home.htm

                                                       iv.     Fact Monster

1.     http://www.factmonster.com/

                                                      v.     HighBeam Encyclopedia

1.     http://www.encyclopedia.com/

                                                       vi.     Columbia Encyclopedia

1.     http://www.bartleby.com/65/

                                                         vii.     Wikipedia

1.     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

 

  1. The Lesson:
    1. Introduction:

                                                     i.     Henry Knox example iMovie is projected on the screen and ready to be played. The students watch the movie the first time through. Then during the second playing, I pause the movie to quickly point out various aspects of the project, such as the images, titles, music, sound that the students will be learning to do.

                                                       ii.     One another day near the end of the project, I project my Henry Knox movie again and students score it with the rubric. Note- it is not a perfect movie and is missing an element.

    1. Methods:

                                                     i.     Day One-

1.     Students draw for the Revolutionary War person they will research and produce a movie about.

2.     The students are shown the different resources that are available, including links, texts, encyclopedias, etc.

3.     The research chart is reviewed  and students are allowed time to research.

                                                       ii.     Day Two-

1.     Play the Henry Knox demonstration movie again with the students using their research chart to watch for content needed in the movie.

2.     Students use the rest of class time for research. If students do not complete the research in class, it will have to be completed as homework.

                                                         iii.     Day Three-

1.     Collect the research from the students. Completed research is checked before the movie can begin.

2.     Demonstrate Google image searching and saving. For iMovie, it is also necessary that the images be at least 200x200. Students use the rest of class time to harvest and save 3-5 still images from the Internet.

                                                        iv.     Day Four-

1.     Introduce iMovie and have the students set up and save their movie project to the hard drive of the movie. It is vital that the movie be saved to the hard drive rather than the server because the server cannot accommodate the large movie sizes.

2.     Students import the images into their project and save.

3.     If time, students begin designing the title slide.

                                                      v.     Day Five-

1.     The goal today is completion of at least the title and resources slides.

2.     Students add the images to the time line and add the information from their research chart.

                                                        vi.     Day Six-

1.     Students add information slides to the timeline. This is a working day. The teacher circulates around the room assisting students.

                                                          vii.     Day Seven-

1.     The teacher demonstrates adding music and sound to the iMovie using sound files and the copyright free music CD’s.

2.     Students must complete the content of the movie before adding the music and sound.

                                                            viii.     Day Eight-

1.     This is the last day to work. All movies must be completed by the end of the class period today.

 

    1. Lesson Closure (daily):

                                                       ii.     Status of the Class (2 minutes)- each student quickly shares where they are in the project process: research, harvesting images, title and resources slides, images in timeline, information slides, music, etc.

                                                     i.     This allows me to get a quick idea of where everyone is in the process and allows me to plan accordingly.

    1. Back Pocket Ideas:

                                                     i.     1776 Magazine and “It’s in the Reading” Worksheet

                                                      ii.     Liberty: Road to Revolution Game

1.     URL: http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/road.html

                                                        iii.     Homework and Practice Book p. 60-61

                                                       iv.     As movies are completed, students may show them to each other in order to gain feedback and make changes before the final due date.

 

    1. Assessment:

                                                     i.     Students are assessed by teacher observation as they research and work on their iMovie. Carrying a clipboard for note taking works well. Then the teacher can write reminders and notes about students to check on.

                                                       ii.     Students must have their iMovie completed by the 4th grade showing date.

                                                         iii.     A rubric is used to score the project. The students self-assess and I also assess their movie.

    1. Reflection:

                                                     i.     At some point during this project, I end up questioning my sanity for attempting 72 iMovies with 5th graders. In the end, it always turns out well and the students really enjoy showing their movies to the 4th graders. This is one of the projects, the 5th graders always ask about at the beginning of the year because they remember visiting the class as 4th graders to see the movies.  Students of all abilities enjoy it, but I do have to be careful to check on their progress because often times the ones who need the most help are the least likely to ask for it. The timing of the slides is a challenge for a few students because the timing of the words must match the time on the image slides.  Because the GATE (gifted and talented) program pulls the students from class, I allow students to come in at other times to work. I also have to remind students about the content quite often so that they don’t get all excited about the extras. I’ve found that they relate very well to the analogy of the content is the cake, the music is the frosting, and the sounds, recordings, and special effects are the sprinkles. They are required to make the cake and frost it. The sprinkles are the extras.

                                                       ii.     I also like this project because the end product is not a typed report that they have copied from the encyclopedia. I do not have to deal with plagiarism because there’s not time in a one minute movie to copy a great deal of textual information. The students must glean the information and summarize it. Then produce a movie that others will understand and enjoy.

                                                         iii.     Most of my students are amazed that women were so actively involved in the Revolutionary War in such a variety of ways, from actively fighting, protesting, nursing the soldiers, writing, etc. It is so true that our textbooks are written from a white male viewpoint! At this time, I have not been able to incorporate as much as I would like about the role of African Americans in the fight for independence.

 



Conclusion:

It was my goal in designing this unit, that I be able to directly use the lessons in my classroom. Because of that I relied upon the Harcourt Brace textbook and ebook, as well as the supporting materials. Then I enhanced those with technology, websites, projects, short video clips, etc. just as I do in my classroom. Because of my previous experience as a technology integrationist, I have 15 wireless laptops in my room full time. It is my goal to use the laptops daily in at least three subject areas in order to enhance learning and engage my students. I have incorporated an iMovie project into this unit because it provides the opportunity for students to research a key person from the war and create a product that is not a typed report. I also have included the role of women in the war so that students can realize that it was not only men who contributed to our freedom from Great Britain. During the research process, students think critically about the information found in their resources.

 

I had not thought about multicultural education a great deal until this course. I found the text to be interesting to read, especially the chapter about the digital divide. My district is still very focused on the ratio of students to computers rather than the type and kind of access. Just because the technology is present, doesn’t mean it is used appropriately and with strong pedagogy. Though I have always tried to include the roles of Native Americans, African Americans, and women in our history. It has not been easy and would not happen very much at all if I had relied totally on the textbook. Even the current text, which was just selected last year, is still lacking in this area. There are a few brief sections about women, African Americans, and Native Americans, which is an improvement over the previous textbook, however. The role of the Internet in multiculturalism has helped because it opens the classroom to a world of resources rather than just the textbook. This makes it easier to find information about people of other cultures and access places the students will not be able to travel to on a field trip. I believe the move toward a multicultural curriculum model will be a slow, step-by-step process with small-scale changes, especially in the upper Midwest where the culture is very conservative. While it is difficult to be patient, I think moving too quickly will backfire.

 

This course was a very enjoyable one for me. I found the projects and assignments to be worthwhile and related very well to technology integration in the Social Studies area. The discussions were not as in depth as I would have liked, but I think that was more because of the shortness of time. One month goes by very quickly and I think our conversations would have been more in depth and with varying viewpoints if the course would have taken place over an entire semester. I also appreciated your sharing of ideas on the General Discussion Board and the way you kept in touch with all of us in your weekly messages. I hope you get the opportunity to teach this course again. The MSET program is not as strong as I would like in the curriculum integration area and this course is an important component. You did a great job!

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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